CHICKEN STOCK

MAKES 7 CUPS
Chicken stock is a basic kitchen ingredient and when it’s this easy to make, you can make your own to have on hand anytime you want it.
Total prep, cooking, and pressure release time: 1 hour 40 minutes
2 pounds bone-in chicken pieces with skin, all visible fat discarded
1 medium carrot, cut into 2-inch strips
1 small onion, quartered
1 medium rib of celery, leaves discarded, cut into 2-inch pieces
4 or 5 whole black peppercorns or ½ teaspoon black pepper (coarsely ground preferred)
¼ teaspoon salt
2 sprigs of fresh Italian (flat-leaf) parsley (about 2 inches long)
2 sprigs of fresh thyme (about 2 inches long)
6 cups water
1. Combine all the ingredients in the pressure cooker. Secure the lid. Cook on high pressure for 45 minutes. Allow the pressure to release naturally.
2. Pour the stock through a fine-mesh sieve into a deep bowl. Discard the solids. Cover and refrigerate the stock for 8 hours.
3. Using a spoon, skim off and discard any fat from the top of the stock. Cover and refrigerate the stock for up to one to two days, or freeze.
COOK’S TIP: Bones add flavor to the stock, and bony pieces, such as chicken backs and wings, make for an even more delicious stock.

COOK’S TIP ON STOCK: Store the stock in measured portions for convenient use. One way to do this is to use a muffin pan. First, check the size of the wells by pouring a measured amount of water into a well. Many muffin pans comfortably hold ⅓ or ½ cup water. Discard the water. Use that measure as a guide to ladle the stock into each well. Freeze the stock until firm. Invert the pan and, if necessary, quickly run water over the back of the pan to dislodge the cubes of stock. Place the frozen stock cubes in a resealable freezer bag. Label and date the bag, including the volume of the cubes. Then, when you need stock, just add a frozen cube, or several to equal the amount of stock needed, to your recipe. For optimal flavor, plan to use frozen stock within one to two months.
PER SERVING
Calories 10
Total Fat 0.0 g
Saturated Fat 0.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 108 mg
Carbohydrates 1 g
Fiber 0 g
Sugars 0 g
Protein 2 g
Dietary Exchanges
refrigerate for 8 hours.
4. Using a spoon, skim off and discard any fat from the top of the stock. Cover and refrigerate for up to one to two days, or freeze.
COOK’S TIP ON STOCK OR BROTH: Frequently, the terms broth and stock are used interchangeably, but technically there is a difference. Both are the result of cooking meat, chicken, or vegetables in water. But stock must be made from bones; the gelatin derived from the bones creates a rich mouthfeel that differentiates stock from broth. Stock is designed for use as an ingredient in other dishes, but broth is seasoned so you can serve it as a light soup. They are very similar, however. For the recipes in this book, feel free to use your own homemade broths or stocks in place of a purchased product.
PER SERVING
Calories 10
Total Fat 0.0 g
Saturated Fat 0.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 30 mg
Carbohydrates 1 g
Fiber 0 g
Sugars 0 g
Protein 2 g
Dietary Exchanges
Free

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